Tuesday, 28 April 2015

2012 Fifty Years of Friendship - New Zealand and Samoa

         New Zealand and Samoa share a special relationship that is underpinned by the 1962 Treaty of Friendship. 2012 marks 50 years of this important partnership, and New Zealand Post celebrated this with very a unique stamp issue. At about the same time these stamps were issued Samoa celebrated 50 years of independence. The stamps issued by Samoa to mark this event can also be seen at the bottom of this post.


An interesting set of five stamps that stand out as being very different to stamps usually issued by New Zealand. Each of the five stamps features a contemporary view of a selu tuiga – a head comb that takes the shape of a traditional tuiga. A tuiga is a Samoan headdress that is worn at important events by the mānaia (son) or the taupou (daughter) of the high chief of the village. The tuiga is a unique symbol of the chiefly nature of Samoan society, and a significant number of tuiga were worn when Samoa gained independence.

Monday, 27 April 2015

2012 Scenic Definitives.

Definitive Tour.
Back to 2009/2010 Scenic Definitives.                                       Forward to 2014 Scenic Definitives.

        Since the 2014 Scenic Definitive Issue has already been covered in this blog, this post will be the last in our Scenic Definitive Series until a new issue appears. We are planning to link them or list them n some way so readers can navigate through them.
        In 2012 three new denominations were added to the current Scenic Definitive Series to cover upcoming changes in postal rates. This stunning new stamp issue showcased three of New Zealand’s most picturesque locations – Cape Reinga, Stewart Island and Lake Matheson.
  
  Also included in this issue were two of the gummed stamps appearing in an adhesive format as well. Earlier in February, another adhesive, $2.40 Lake Rotorua had already been issued, making the six stamps shown here.

Monday, 20 April 2015

1958 & 1998 - Pania of the Reef.

For an index to all our posts on The Maori People.

This post was inspired by something in the post Mary has just completed 1958 Anniversaries. In the Hawke's Bay Centennial issue is a stamp 2d - Pania of the Reef. This statue caught my interest as I remembered seeing it in the 1998 Town Icons issue too. (Both stamps are shown below). So in looking deeper I discovered the story of Pania of the Reef; a Maori legend or myth, a romantic yet tragic love-story, and a beautiful bronze statue.  

The Stamps.
                                 
1958 Hawke's Bay Centennial.                                       1998 Town Icons - Napier, NZ.
Pania can be found on other New Zealand stamps but in the two shown
above she take centre place as the main subject of the stamp.
For more about the heitiki she is wearing see story below or visit our post Heitiki


Sunday, 19 April 2015

1958 Anniversaries.

1958 First Trans-Tasman Flight 30th Anniversary
- Kingsford Smith.

                                 
6d New Zealand.                                                            8d Australia.

 This stamp was issued to commemorate the 30th anniversary of Sir Charles Kingsford Smith's first Trans-Tasman flight with Charles T.P. Ulm as co pilot. The stamp was issued jointly by Australia and New Zealand (both shown here). The stamp featured the Southern Cross with the portrait of Sir Charles Kingsford Smith and his aircraft, also called Southern Cross.

Saturday, 18 April 2015

Simpson and his Donkey.

This post was inspired by one of the stamps from 2015 - The Spirit of ANZAC - 1915.



         On the 25th of April, 1915, Australian and New Zealand troops saw action for the first time in World War I.  The aim of the campaign was to capture Constantinople (now Istanbul) and eliminated both of Germany's Balkan allies (Turkey and Bulgaria) from the war. 

         This poorly planned landing went wrong from the start. Instead of landing on the chosen beach the Australian and New Zealanders landed further north on a narrow beach surrounded by steep hills. For six months they held this beach, making little headway inland against fierce resistance from the Turkish soldiers. Finally the decision had to be made to pull the troops back off the beach.

Friday, 17 April 2015

2015 New Zealand Native Shells

New Zealand’s diversity of seashell fauna can be attributed to our isolation and geological history, allowing for over 2000 native seashell species to thrive in our waters. I was amazed to learn that there were as many as that. In this issue we see five of these species found only in New Zealand, ranging from the common silver paua to the prized deep-water golden volute.
                             
    80c - Silver Paua.                                    $1.40 - Scott’s Murex.                              $2.00 - Golden volute.
                
    $2.50 - Fan shell.                                 $3.00 - Opal top shell.

Wednesday, 15 April 2015

1894 The Wreck of the SS Wairarapa.

         In the third worst shipwreck ever in New Zealand waters, 121 lives were lost when the Union Steam Ship Company steamer SS Wairarapa struck Miners Head, on the northern tip of Great Barrier Island, 90 km north-east of Auckland. As the island’s only contact with the outside world was via a weekly steamer, news of the shipwreck took three days to reach Auckland. This highlighted the need for better communication between the island and the mainland. A need that would eventually lead to the Great Barrier Pigeongram Services.

Thursday, 9 April 2015

1936 - 1965 - Early ANZAC Issues.


          On the 25th of April, 1915, New Zealand troops saw action for the first time in World War I.  The aim of the campaign was to capture Constantinople (now Istanbul).  The goal was to eliminated both of Germany's Balkan allies (Turkey and Bulgaria) from the war, and relieved the Russians from the heavy German pressure they were facing. 
         The poorly planned landing went wrong from the start. Instead of landing on the chosen beach the Australian and New Zealanders landed further north on a narrow beach surrounded by steep hills. For six months they held this beach, making little headway inland against fierce resistance from the Turkish soldiers. Finally the decision had to be made to pull the troops back off the beach.
        This heroic but disastrous campaign left 2,721 New Zealanders dead and 4,752 wounded which was a big hit for such a small country. Over the years much criticism has been made of the British leaders who planned this attack. It would eventually lead to the New Zealand and Australian military becoming more independent from Britain.  
        The campaign became a symbol of New Zealand (and Australia's) war losses. The 25th of April is observed in both countries as ANZAC Day - to remember those countries men and women whose lives were lost in war. 'ANZAC' is an acronym made up of the initials of the 'Australian and New Zealand Army Corps'.
 

Friday, 3 April 2015

2009 - 2010 Scenic Definitives.

Definitive Tour.
   Back to 2007 Scenic Definitives.                                           Forward to 2012 Scenic Definitives.  

   

   New Zealand Post continued with its Scenic Definitive Series with two issues in 2009 & 2010. Again the scenes were spread widely across New Zealand. While I like these stamps and have enjoyed featuring them in this series of posts I can't help wondering if this definitive series doesn't get mixed up with issues from the longer running scenic series that appears each year.   

Thursday, 2 April 2015

1955 Stamp Centenary

      This set has already been shown on this blog, in our post - 2005 - 150 Years of New Zealand Stampsbut considering the importance of this issue to the history of New Zealand Stamps, we felt it deserved its own page. I believe the clever way these three stamps were designed is often overlooked by collectors in their search for more attractive and exciting stamps. I hope this page below might go some way to correcting this.


         This 1955 issue featured the three values shown above. While appearing to be simple designs, I will show you below that some thought has gone into them, cleverly linking the stamps and postal system of 1855, with the stamps and postal system of 1955.  
        Designs of three of the most famous designers of New Zealand stamps were selected. R M Conly's design depicting a Maori Mail Runner was used for the 2d stamp, J Berry's design depicting Queen Elizabeth II in a style similar to that of the first New Zealand stamps was selected for the 3d stamp and A G Mitchell's design depicting an aircraft in flight appeared on the 4d stamp. Three famous designers, another claim to fame for this often under-rated stamp issue.