Sunday, 28 January 2018

2018 New Zealand in Space

        On Sunday 21 January 2018 New Zealand’s role in the international aerospace industry was elevated to a whole new level when Rocket Lab launched its Electron rocket into orbit from Mahia Peninsula.
        NZ Post celebrated this extraordinary achievement with a commemorative stamp sheet containing the six stamps seen below. Further down will be the sheet itself, followed by the enlarged stamps and detailed captions.
       Virtual New Zealand Stamps wishes to congratulate NZ Post for developing and releasing this issue so quickly after the rocket's flight. They are six great stamps on a subject not usually seen on New Zealand stamps.

The Six Stamps.

Friday, 26 January 2018

Resene Stamps - Part Three (2010 - 2018).

Resene Stamps - Page One (2002 - 2004)


Resene Stamps - Page Three (2010 - 2018)

  

New Zealand Mail is an accredited New Zealand Post service provider. Supplying specialist services to businesses requiring dedicated help with high volume mail facilities for mail handling, mail franking and hybrid mail services. They even provide a wide range of stamps and postage paid envelope options. While Resene Paints do not produce, market or sell these stamps through their own stores, the stamps do provide a welcome, if rather an unusual form of advertising. They also use these stamps for their own postage requirements.

Produced and distributed by originally Stamps at Work, then Black Sheep Stamps and now NZ Mail, the stamps are predominantly sold through convenience outlets all over New Zealand. Resene postage stamps are just another way Resene is adding colour to our community. The stamps are legal postage stamps and can be used to send letters domestically and internationally, that is if you can bear to part with them!


   

Thursday, 25 January 2018

Resene Stamps - Part Two (2005 - 2009)

Resene Stamps - Page One (2002 - 2004)

  Resene Stamps - Page Two (2005 - 2009) 



New Zealand Mail is an accredited New Zealand Post service provider. Supplying specialist services to businesses requiring dedicated help with high volume mail facilities for mail handling, mail franking and hybrid mail services. They even provide a wide range of stamps and postage paid envelope options. While Resene Paints do not produce, market or sell these stamps through their own stores, the stamps do provide a welcome, if rather an unusual form of advertising. They also use these stamps for their own postage requirements.

Produced and distributed by originally Stamps at Work, then Black Sheep Stamps and now NZ Mail, the stamps are predominantly sold through convenience outlets all over New Zealand. Resene postage stamps are just another way Resene is adding colour to our community. The stamps are legal postage stamps and can be used to send letters domestically and internationally, that is if you can bear to part with them!

                      

Wednesday, 24 January 2018

Resene Stamps - Part One (2002 - 2004)

Resene Stamps - Page One (2002 - 2004)

  Resene Stamps - Page Two (2005 - 2009) 

Resene Stamps - Page Three (2010 - 2018)



New Zealand Mail is an accredited New Zealand Post service provider. Supplying specialist services to businesses requiring dedicated help with high volume mail facilities for mail handling, mail franking and hybrid mail services. They even provide a wide range of stamps and postage paid envelope options. While Resene Paints do not produce, market or sell these stamps through their own stores, the stamps do provide a welcome, if rather an unusual form of advertising. They also use these stamps for their own postage requirements.

Produced and distributed by originally Stamps at Work, then Black Sheep Stamps and now NZ Mail, the stamps are predominantly sold through convenience outlets all over New Zealand. Resene postage stamps are just another way Resene is adding colour to our community. The stamps are legal postage stamps and can be used to send letters domestically and internationally, that is if you can bear to part with them!

These stamps were shown on two websites and in both cases, the information was lacking and images of very poor quality. While we would rather not include images like these I think the stamps are of interest. 
             

Thursday, 18 January 2018

2008 Weather Extremes

        New Zealand Post is committed to sustainability and currently exploring ways to minimise its impact on the environment. This stamp issue was part of that commitment – highlighting New Zealand’s own weather extremes, which are remarkably diverse for such a small nation. Each of the stamps in this issue focused on different elements of New Zealand's weather extremes.

        As the climate warms, New Zealand is expected to experience more weather extremes. They will reach into all aspects of life in this country. The first-day cover highlighted our weather extremes in one place, displaying all six stamps and their dramatic images illustrating the impact of climate change, which through warmer weather is expected to have a significant effect on our agricultural industry.

In my line of work, dairy farming, the weather plays a huge part in our business. Our milking season begins in August so it is important that we have a good spring. Too much rain and cold, the grass doesn't get away. Not enough rain and again we don't make good hay and run out of feed. Then there is flooding on the bottom flats. Windburn up on the top ridge. Cold winds during lambing. Mud, frost, rain, wind -  sounds like fun doesn't it?  

Tuesday, 16 January 2018

2008 Sir Edmund Hillary


         Sir Edmund Percival Hillary KG, ONZ, KBE (20th July 1919 – 11th January 2008) was a New Zealand mountaineer and explorer. On the 29th of May 1953, he and Sherpa mountaineer Tenzing Norgay became the first climbers known to have reached the summit of Mount Everest.

Monday, 15 January 2018

2008 150th Anniversary of Kingitanga

150th Anniversary of the Maori King Movement.
For other stamps with Maori themes see our New Zealand Maori.


Faith, Love & Law.

         The Māori King Movement or Kīngitanga is a movement that arose among some Māori tribes in the 1850s to establish a symbolic role similar in status to that of the monarch of the British colonists. The position of a Māori monarch is a non-constitutional role with no legal power but it is a symbolic role of great prestige (mana). Since the 1850s the role has been vested in the Tainui iwi (tribe), centred in the Waikato region, who agreed to guard the position when it was created. The current Māori monarch, Tuheitia Paki, is descended from the first Māori king, Pōtatau Te Wherowhero, and was elected in 2006. His official residence is Turongo House at Turangawaewae Marae in the town of Ngaruawahia.
         Since it was established, the Kīngitanga movement and influence has expanded and now is recognised and respected by Māori in many parts of New Zealand today. Some iwi such the Ngapuhi iwi of Northland are strongly against the Maori king movement and find the use of the name "Maori King" offensive.
        While the Maori King has no direct connection with the New Zealand Government regarding the legal decision-making process, he/she is often consulted and advice taken on matters concerning Maori. It is also usual, but a tradition of respect rather than set in law, that the British monarch and the Maori monarch will meet if they are in the same country.          
         The position of Māori monarch is not hereditary in principle. The monarch is appointed by the leaders of the tribes involved in the Kīngitanga movement on the day of the previous monarch’s funeral and before the burial. However, to date, all Māori monarchs have been direct descendants of Pōtatau Te Wherowhero, the first Māori king, and each monarch has been succeeded by a son or daughter. 
         This position has been held by Pōtatau, Māori King (1856 – 1860); Tāwhiao, Māori King (1860 – 1894); Mahuta, Māori King (1894 – 1912); Te Rata, Māori King (1912 – 1933); Korokī, Māori King (1933 – 1966); Dame Te Atairangikaahu, Māori Queen (1966 – 2006); Tuheitia Paki, Māori King (2006 – ).

Thursday, 11 January 2018

2009 New Zealand Champions of World Motorsport

  '

       Kiwis are known for their adventurousness, so it’s no surprise that we’ve produced some of the world’s fastest racing car drivers and motorcyclists. Motorsport has been part of our lifeblood since cars first arrived on our shores, with fans turning out in their thousands to watch – spellbound by the vehicles, the speed and the battle for glory.
        New Zealand Post produced this issue of five gummed stamps and two adhesives. Also included in the issue were a miniature sheet, miniature sheet first day cover, and for the first time since 2005, a series of five postage-included souvenir cards (maximum cards). The maximum cards featured the champion's portrait, their stamps and an action shot. 

Friday, 5 January 2018

2009 Lighthouses

 
         In 2009, NZ Post commemorated the 150th anniversary of New Zealand’s first lighthouse (Pencarrow) with five distinctive stamps. Each stamp featured a technological ‘landmark’ of its own – lighthouse beams that actually glow in the dark! You can see the slightly unusual texture of the lighthouse beams in these stamp images.

          As true landmarks of New Zealand, lighthouses continue to have an important role for ships entering and leaving New Zealand’s waters, helping sailors to calculate their distances from land and travelling speeds, providing effective warnings of potential danger and signalling entrances to safe harbours. 

          Today, all lighthouses are automated – the last to be converted was The Brothers lighthouse in July 1990. And while few of those built of local hardwood have survived due to the harsh conditions on New Zealand’s coastlines, the lighthouses made of hardier materials such as stone or concrete, continue to perform, decade after decade.

Thursday, 4 January 2018

1994/1995 A to B Self Adhesive Coil Stamp

What appeared to be a simple post, quickly turned into a much more complex story.



       The 45 cent self-adhesive coil stamp design was introduced in July 1994. The letter A representing the sender and B representing the recipient of the mail. In June 1995 Leigh-Marden advised New Zealand Post that they were withdrawing from the stamp printing business and an order was placed with Sprintpak Pty Ltd to ensure supply continuity. In October 1995 postal rates were decreased and printings were done by both of the companies mentioned above.

       So this leaves us with four different but easily identifiable varieties as can be seen in the group above.