Tuesday, 16 December 2014

Arms Postal Fiscals - Part Three.

         This will be my last post on Revenue Stamps. I feel it is about time I moved on to something else. In this, my final post of Revenue Stamps, I want to just present a small collection of items where the Arms Stamps have been used. First I have included some postal items using Arms Type stamps. Lower down we come to a few examples of Revenue use, including a nice little collection of telephone toll cards. I will end this study with what I have called the ultimate Revenue document. Make sure you check that one out.

Postal Use. 

A First Flight Pictorial cover, dated 19th July 1940, sent to the USA and return, via Noumea, Canton Island, Hawaii. The postage was 4/- paid with a 4/- Arms stamp. 

This is an 8/- Arms single on a censored airmail cover sent to the USA from Auckland, dated 4th October 1941. Notice the words 'Trans-Pacific' above the airmail sticker in the top left corner. 

A 1946 small Parcel Mail Tag used Hataitai to London, with Arms 2/6 pair plus 1935 Pictorial 2/- Captain Cook. This is an interesting combination to make up the postal rate of 7/-.

1941 Cover sent to HMS Prince of Wales. It was sent via London but didn't reach the ship before it was sunk by the Japanese.
See my special post on this item.


Revenue Use.   
Revenues Arms on piece,  £100,  £200 &  £300 overprints. All three have been punched on the document, showing clearly they were for Revenue Use.

A 1948 land document for land bought at Featherston for  £600. Stamp duty of  £6 12/- was paid consisting of a £6 arms overprint and a 6/- Arms pair used, all are unpunched, which is very unusual for Revenue Stamps.

NZ 1931 15/- Arms used on Document, nice share transfer document, 15/- Arms unpunched but used as stamp duty.

Telephone Toll Cards.
 
 1951 telephone toll card, used at Kairaki Beach with a double circle cancel on a single 5/- Arms stamp.

 1st March 1950 telephone toll card, Manners St. It has a very clear franking strike with 10/- Arms, 5d & 6d George VI stamps.

 1951 telephone toll card, Mount Maunganui with 1931 10/- Arms plus 8d George VI. This is an unusual usage of the 10/- Arms value on a toll card.

 NZ Post telephone toll card bearing 2/- George VI pair, 2d orange and 5/- Arms used in  Tokoroa, 10th April 1951.

 1951 telephone toll card, Mount Maunganui postal cancel, 1931 Arms 2/6 pair and 6d George VI.

 Dated 30th January 1951, a telephone toll card, Mount Maunganui postal cancel, 1931 Arms 2/6 pair and 4d George VI.  

1951 telephone toll card, Mount Maunganui postal cancel, 1931 Arms 2/6 single plus 2/- George VI. This is a nice combination of postal and Fiscal stamps.

The Ultimate Revenue Document.

 The ultimate Revenue document, a 1939 single-page document bearing 13 stamps including 7 Gold Revenues. The gold values includes  £18,630;   £12,000;  £8,000;  £6,500;  £6,400;  £4,800 and  £3, 400. To add to this, the other stamps include the rare  £600  Queen Victoria,  £1000 pound Arms pair etc., adding up to a total of £62330 13s 6d.  This is really an amazing collection of stamps so to have them on the one document like this is really something special.

Sir Harold Beauchamp (15 November 1858 – 5 October 1938) was a New Zealand banker and is remembered as the father of author Katherine Mansfield. The date of this document was 16 October 1938 showing this £62330 13s 6d to be the death duties paid on his estate. Thanks to the comment made below for this interesting information.


Some of the images and prices in this post were used with permission from the illustrated catalogue of StampsNZ
You can visit their web site and On-line Catalogue at, http://stampsnz.com/ 

Some information on this post came from the NZ Post Web Site. 

3 comments:

  1. What an amazing document. So many revenue stamps and such a high value for the time it was used. Another different but interesting selection for your special posts page.
    Ronnie

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  2. Sir Harold Beauchamp, as well as being a well known NZ identity in his own right, was Katherine Mansfield's father.
    Would that massive amount (£62330 13s 6d) have been death duties on his estate?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You are right there. It is an estate death duties document. I've never really stopped to look at who it was. Thank you so much for that very useful information.
      Allan

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